Fall 2017 Newsletter

CLASS OF 1956 BREAKFAST

PLACE: Palace Restaurant

3250 Easton Avenue

Bethlehem, PA. (physical address: Butztown, Pa.)

DIRECTIONS: From 25th Street and William Penn Highway (Walgreens Drug Store and E.A.H.S). Take Wm. Penn Highway (west toward Bethlehem) which will become Easton Avenue. Continue to Butztown (approximately 5 miles). Just past the stop light and intersection, (Willow Park Road on left and tavern on the right) will be the Palace Restaurant on the left.

DATE: Saturday September 9, 2017

TIME: 9:00 AM

MENU: French Toast, Scrambled Eggs, Home Fries, Bacon, Sausage,

Orange and Apple Juice, Fruit Cup, Coffee, Tea

COST: $13.00 PER PERSON

 

SEND YOUR CHECK SO IT ARRIVES

NO LATER THAN AUGUST 31, 2017

PAYABLE TO "EHS CLASS OF 1956"

MAIL TO

SHERWOOD "WOODY" FRANKENFIELD

3515 RICHMOND ROAD

EASTON, PA. 18040

Which of the movie theaters was you favorite?

What do you remember about the following theaters: Starlite, Embassy, Easton, State, Berwick, Wilbor, Boyd?

The movie theatre that was in the last newsletter was the Star Theater. More about the Star Theater page 4.

Beverly Taylor Blasco writes: I went to the Starlite with friends and Tony. The Embassy was more elegant inside. My favorate theater was the Easton Theater (Ranch House) We would pack lunches and stay all day. I was the shortest so I could sneak to the head of the line and get in sooner. The Berwick was noisy. The owners would turn out the lights if we would not behave. I never went to the Wilbur. The Boyd was nice, I went there often.

John Ackerman writes: On my first date with my future wife, Roberta, I took her to the Starlite, we saw Urban Cowboy. The first movie I ever saw was at the Boyd it was Old Yeller.

Bill Shoudt writes: I remember at the State the tickets were twenty cents. The Boyd had the most comfortable seats.

Jane Klock Bond writes: I remember making out at the Starlite during Ben-Hur. The Boyd was the first theater coming into Easton.

Kay Schulte Niedzwiecki writes: The Wilbor was not my favorite but I have a lot of memories of that theater. When I was a little girl and lived in Scranton, Pa. my aunt who lived in Wilson would take my sister and I to the Wlibor on Tuesdays for dish night, every summer.

Janet Transue Herr writes: True confession: When I was young I wore wool leggings. My mother took me to see a scary movie, at the Wilbor. I not only hid on the floor, I also wet my leggings. Yuck - wool takes a long time to dry.

Don Herr writes: I liked the Berwick on nickel days. When Janet and I dated, we saw Martin and Lewis comedies, The Ten Commandments, Ben Hur and later we went to the drive-ins.

Sandy Moser Zemgulis writes: We would go to the Starlite by the car full, The Embassy was nice but wasn’t first class like the State and the Boyd. I never went to the Easton or Wilbor. The State has always been a beautiful theater. The boyd was a favorite of mine years ago.

Leon Paulus writes: Most movies in the past showed a newreel and cartoons. We took the kids to the Starlite. They watched the movies from the roof of our 1966 Dodge Dart station wagon. I remember when the Embassy showed the movie Bob and Sally. That movie was suposed to be about sex or abstanance. I only went to the State a few Times. The Berwick was seventeen cents. You got five cents worth of pretzels at Sue’s grocery store next to the theater. The last movie I saw at the Boyd was Doctor Zhivago.

Pat Fisher writes: At the Starlite we used to play Chinese Fire Drill before the movie started. The only time I went to the Embassy I was in line behind a girl who had bugs all over her dress. I was not allowed to go to the Easton Theater. The state was the best theater. I went there all the time. Best Movies! Good Balcony. I never went to the Berwick or the Wilbor in Wilson. The Boyd was the next best theater. When I went to the Boyd I went with a group of kids.

Liz Saylor Perelli writes: The Starlite was a fun theater. I never went to the Embassy, the Easton, the Berwick or the Wilbor Theaters. The State had a lot of good shows. The Boyd would be my second choice of theaters.

Pat Allen writes: The first movie I saw at the Starlite was Gone With the Wind with my parents. Later, as a teenager I went there more often. In the early years I went to the State with Judy Kalher Campbell and my Aunt Helen and with dates.

Judy Kashler Campbell: The Starlite was a nice drive-in. The State was a great place and is still going strong. The Boyd was a small theater.

JoAnne Boccadoro Butler writes: I went to all of the theaters mentioned except the Berwick; I never went there. I would have to judge (rate) the others according to my age when attending it. When I was young, I went with my older brother to the Easton Theater on weekends, usually Saturday and Sunday afternoons. Other friends would go with us. He would wait for me and hold my hand when crossing the streets on the way there. When in the theater, he would have to walk me to the Girl’s Room when I requested, stand and watch the movie until I came out and walk me back to the seats. What a pain I must have been. Cowboy movies (double features), Charlie Chan, Abbot and Costello, etc. That was great then. When older, i.e.. teens, twenties and thirties, we went to the Boyd, Embassy, the Starlite and the Bethlehem Drive Ins. I did not go to the State Theater until way later and for the shows that they have today. We and our parents were so fortunate to have so many theaters nearby. I never went to the theater across the river, the Main, on South Main St, P’burg.

Frank Mazza writes: I liked the Starlite Drive in O’Boy. The Embassy was a normal theater. The Easton showed mostly cowboy movies hence the nicknme Ranch House. The State was a normal theater. Does anyone remember that the State showed Deep Throat. I saw it and was embarresed. I lived a block away from the Berwick. I remember that the Boyd at one time had bats flying around in the theater.

John Curley writes: The State Theater was the one with the most prominent movies: Gone With the Wind, Bells of St. Mary, etc. The Easton had double features. The Berwick was in decline.

Len Buscemi writes: As a youngster we would go to the Starlite $1.00 per carload and what a carlod we would have. Later with the family we would make a big bag of popcorn and a gallon of koolaid and go with the kids.I did not go to the Embassy much but it was a nice theater. I lived at the Easton. It cost about 12-15 cents Saturday mornings. I would go to a local store go around the back get some soda bottles and cash them in to get money to go to the Ranch House. Dad would be walking down the asile about 5-6 pm calling me home for supper.. When I was in the service I went out with three girls named Pat at the same time. On one weekend home, on Friday night, I took Pat 1 to the State to see High Society, on Saturday night Pat 2 wanted to see High Society, on Sunday night Pat 3 wanted to see High Society. The ticket girl, on Sunday, said you here again. I never went to he Berwick. I only went one time to the Wilbor it was a cowboy movie. The Boyd was my favorite. Early on I would go with my then girlfriend and we would sit in the last row. Latter Mike Sos was an usher and I got in free.

Mary Starky Guadagningo writes: I loved going to the Berwick mostly on Friday nights. I livedin the 10 hundred block of Berwick & the Berwick was on the500 block. Harriet Caviston Miller a few other friends and I would walk to the theater. My 1st date with Peter was at the State. Had a great time.

Kay Schulte Niedzwiecki writes: We have a new great grandson, Logan Anthony Orellana, born premature 6/13/17. This is great grandchild #7 please keep him in your prayers.

Dee DeHart Arcuey writes: So sorry that I am unable to make the picnic but I hope to attend a breakfast. My memories of the movie theatres was the Boyd being my favorite, comphy seats, The Wilbor for free dishes. My best to all.

Judy Seifert Everitt writes: I am sorry I will not be able to attend the picnic on the 18th. I will be out of town at a family event.

The New Market House, on South 3rd Street, housed the Bijou Theatre. The Bijou opened 9/18/1896. In the summer of 1904 the first showing of movies in Easton occured at the Bijou Theatre.

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The Market House was consumeed by fire 3/5/1912. Immediately after the fire the building was raised and the Montgomery Ward Building was erected. The Third Street theatre opened 5/15/1913 in the same location as the Bijou. The Third St. Theatre closed 5/1936

 

The Berwick Theatre opened at 520 Berwick St. on 4/10/1915. The theatre closed around 1/28/1959

    

The Easton Casino Theatre opened inside the Arcade building in 8/1908. The teatre closed sometime after 1915. The Circle Theatre, extreme left of picture on the left, opened at 60 Center Square on 10/24/1914. The theatre closed around 2/1917.

  

On 9/16/1936 the Transit Theatre opened in the Third Street Theatre building. On 3/24/1939 the name was changed to the Easton Theatre, better known as the "Ranch House." On 12/10/1957 the Easton Theatre closed and 12/1957 the building was raised.

  

The Comus Theatre opened at Bushkill Park on 5/18/1905. This outdoor theatrte closed in 1908. The Casino Theatre at Island Park opened 7/18/1894. The theatre closed when the park was closed in 1919.

The Pastime Theatre opened at 21 N. 4th St. on 3/23/1909 on 4/4/1910 it became the New Pastime Theatre. The Pastime closed in 12/1917. On 12/24/1917 The Fourth Street Theatre opened in its place

The Media Drive-In opened at U. S. Alternate Route 22, Freemansburg Ave. & Mine Lane Rd., on 7/29/1949. On 4/5/1954 the the name was changed to the Starlite Drive-In. The theatre closed in the early 2000s.

 

The Twelfth St. Theatre opened at 47 S. 12th St. on 9/24/1914. The theatre was short lived closing in 1914. The theatre reopened on 3/1/1915 it closed permanitly in 10/1916.

The Budco 25th Street Cinema opened on 12/21/1979. This theater changes names several times. It was once AMC 25 Street 4, Easton’s first Tri-Plex Theatre. The theatre closed in 1999.

 

The Able Opera House opened at 344 Northampton St. on 3/3/1873. After a fire on 3/25/1926 it closed. At the front of the opera house was the Jewel Theatre which opened in 4/1907. The Jewel Theatre closed on 12/29/1917. After the fire and extensive renovation the Embassy Theatre opened in the Able opera House building on 3/19/1927. The theatre closed in 5/1956.

 

The Eric Twin opened at 175 S.3rd St. on 6/25/75. By 12/14/1984 the theater was known as Eric Easton 6. The theater closed and reopended around 2000 for a short time as the Paridesimo. The building was raised and is now the site of Easton’s City Hall.

 

he Wonderland Theatre opened in the former White Palace, a vaudeville theatre, 0n 10/27/1897. The theatre closed in early 1901 and was consumed by fire on 6/16/1901. At the burned out location a 1,500 seat theatre was erected. The Orpheum Theatre opened 12/23/1907. The theatre closed in 1/1933 and the building was raised around 1945.

he New Family Theatre located in Correll Hall on theSW corner of Pine & Bank Sts. opened 3/20/1906 and closed 3/22/1906. The theatre reopened 3/22/1906 as the Liric Family Theatre. The theatre closed in 11/1907. The Wilbor Theatre located at 1709 Washington Blvd. opened on 5/27/1921. The theatre closed in 1954. It was refited to a roller rink and a pool hall. Curently a dance studio.

The Seville Theatre located at 52 N. 3rd St opened 2/21/1929. The interior was designed to give the patrons the illusion of being in a Spanish Garden. The theatre closed in early 1933.

On March 10, 1933 the Boyd Theatre opened in the Siville Theatre building. This theatre closed 5/24/72. The building was raised 12/1/1975.

The Neumeyer Theatre located at 453 Northampton St. opened in the former Northampton National Bank building on 8/29/1910. The Theatre closed 9/6/1914.

The Northampton St. Theatre opened at 453 Northampton St. in the former Neumeyer Theatre on 9/7/1914 and closed in 1/1916. The theatre immediately reopened as the Neumeyer theatre. On 10/10/1916 the Colonial Theatre opened in the Neumeyer Theatre. The Colonial Theatre closed 7/23/1925.

After extensive renovation where the theatre was enlarged, from 800 seats to 1500 seats, the State Theatre on 3/8/1926 opened in the Colonial Theatre building. Curently known as the State Theatre Center for the arts.

The Star Theatre located at 679-681 Northamnpton St. opened 10/15/1909. The seating capacity was 750 patrons. At one point the Star closed only to reopen 2/14/1919. Again on 7/14/1923 the Star closed and reopened on 10/20/1923. The Star permentanly closed on 3/10/1925. After extensive renovation and the intallation of an organ the Roxy Theatre oppened in the Star Theatre building. The Roxy closed in 2/1928 and had a grand reopening on 12/31/1928. The Roxy closed for good in 1/1929. The building was consumed by fire 2/16/1935.

The Strand Theatre located at 516 Northampton St. opened 5/8/15 in the Odd Fellows Hall Temple.The theatre had 700 seats. After instalaton of Western Electric Sound and renovation through out, the theatre was known as New Strand Theatre on 11/17/1930 the name reverted back to Strand Theatre. This theatre closed 11/10/1939. It reopened for a short while before being sold to the VFW.

Boys Track & Field

5/9/17 EAHS 110.5 Bethlehem Cath. 39.5

Eastern Pennsylvania Conference Championship

5/10 EAHS 88.5 Parkland 84.5 Pleasant Valley 82.5

EAHS wins the championship

5/16-17 District 11 Track & Field Championships

800 meter Stephen Kraus 1st place

3200 meters Ethan Bernstein 3rd place

110 hurdles Katrell Thompson 3rd place

300 Hurdles Michael Couch 3rd place

1000 relay EAHS 2nd place

Shot Put Elek Ferency 2nd place

High Jump Tawheed Muhammad 2nd place

Girls Track & Field

5/0/17 EAHS 87.7 Bethlehem Cath. 61.3

Eastern Pennsylvania Conference Championship

EAHS finished in 9th place

5/16-17 District 11 Track & Field Championships

400 meters Nina Corpora 3rd place

1600 relay Nina Corpora, Kate Willshaw, Alyssa Repdher, Elissa Slader 1st place

High Jump Kate Willshaw 1st place.

5/25 PIAA 3A Track & Field Championships

Day 1 Katrell Thompson 110 hurdles advances

Boys Baseball

5/8/17 EAHS 5 Freedom 6

5/10 EAHS 9 Bethlehem Cath. 3

5/11 EAHS 11 East Stroudsburg S 1

5/12 EAHS 7 Whitehall 0

5/18 EAHS 4 Phillipsburg 0

5/23 District 11 Class 6A Playoffs

Quarterfinals EAHS 2 Stroudsburg 4

Girls Softball

5/8/17 EAHS 11 Freedom 1

5/10 EAHS 2 Bethlehem Cath. 8

5/11 EAHS 9 Whitehall 8

5/12 EAHS 3 Bethlehem Cath. 12

5/23 District 11 Class 6A Playoffs

Quarterfinals EAHS 4 Whitehall 3

Boy’s Volleyball

5/9/17 EAHS Loses to Parkland

5/11 EAHS Defeats Bethlehem Cath.

5/18 District 11-2 3A First round

EAHS defeats Freedom

Boys Lacrosse

5/8/17 EAHS 11 Nazareth 4

5/15 District 11 Class 3A Playoffs

Quarter final EAHS 17 Freedom 3

5/23 Semifinal EAHS 6 Parkland 14

Girls Lacrosse

5/10/17 Semi finals EAHS 20 Emmaus 11

5/15 Finals EAHS 10 Parkland 14

Districtg 11 Class 3A Championship

5/24 EAHS 8 Parkland 9

Girls Basketball

Holy Name Girls Basketball Summer Tournament

5/20/17 Semi final EAHS 57 Allentown CC 49

Final EAHS 41 Nazareth 33

Jordan Oliver 2017 USA Open Champion

Jordan is an EAHS graduate and an alumni of St. Anthony’s Youth Center

MOM'S BIBLE.

Four brothers left home for University, and they all became successful doctors and lawyers. One evening, they chatted after having dinner together. They discussed the 95th birthday gifts they were able to give their elderly mother who had moved to the Gold Coast. The first said, "You know I had a big house built for Mom. The second said, "And I had a large theatre built in the house. The third said, "And I had my Mercedes dealer deliver an SL600 to her. The fourth said, "You know how Mom loved reading the Bible and you know she can't read anymore because she can't see very well. I met this Minister who told me about a parrot who could recite the entire Bible. It took ten Ministers almost 8 years to teach him. I had to pledge to contribute $50,000 a year for five years to the church, but it was worth it. Mom only has to name the chapter and verse, and the parrot will recite it."

The other brothers were impressed. After the celebration Mom sent out her "Thank You" notes.She wrote: "Michael, the house you built is so huge that I live in only one room, but I have to clean the whole house. Thanks anyway."

"Mervin, I am too old to travel. I stay home; I have my groceries delivered, so I never use the Mercedes. The thought was good. Thanks. "Mark, you gave me an expensive theatre with Dolby sound and it can hold 50 people, but all of my friends are dead, I've lost my hearing, and I'm nearly blind. I'll never use it. Thank you for the gesture just the same. "Dearest Mitchell, you were the only son to have the good sense to give a little thought to your gift. The chicken was delicious. Thank you so much."

Love, Mom Submitted by Wayne Werner

Send a classmate a Birthday Card

Oct. 1 Charles Bartolet Oct. 8 Georgia Jallos Sos

Oct. 11 Jacqueline Dickey Blackman

Oct. 13 Louise Balliet Liptak

Oct. 14 Shirley Foss Schweder

Oct. 14 Donald Johnson

Oct. 15 Elaine Clemens

Oct. 17 Raymond Black

Oct. 17 Elizabeth Saylor Perelli

Oct. 20 Patricia Moyer Lutz

Oct. 22 Thomas Bibleheimer

Oct. 24 Robert Eschenbach

Oct. 24 Kathleen Seawood Collina

Oct. 25 Joanne Monitti D’Agostino

Oct. 26 Peter Bretsky, Jr.

Oct. 27 Georgetta Hannah Gittens

Oct. 29 Carole Holland

Oct. 30 Alice Cuvo Loebsack

Nov. 1 Stephanie Richards Cohen Nov. 4 Marilyn Jones Haines

Nov. 7 William Hartman

Nov. 7 Marvin Rosenblum

Nov. 8 Judith Kahler Campbell

Nov. 10 James Kiick

Nov. 10 James LaBarba Nov. 11 David Mazzie

Nov. 12 Janet Transue Herr

Nov. 15 Lovene Heller

Nov. 15 Margaret Bennett

Nov. 23 Frank Mazza

Nov. 29 Sandra Crusan Kovacs

Nov. 29 Sandra Moser Zemgulis

Nov. 29 Patrica Yasunsky.McNally

Dec. 1 Rose Capecci Koder

Dec. 2 Leon Weaver

Dec. 2 Alfred DiFelice

Dec. 4 Jean Sigafoos Williams

Dec. 9 Joyce Streeter Armendaris

Dec. 13 Willard Barlieb

Dec. 12 Doris Orlowek Teich

Dec. 15 Russell Christian

Dec. 18 Avis Frable Heller

Dec. 19 Charles Claus

Dec. 19 Marjorie McGraw McDonald

Dec. 21 Carol Squarcia Shimoskie

Dec. 23 Carol Dech Stout

Dec. 25 Darla Haffling Tuller

Dec. 25 Frances Miechur Hamlin

Dec. 26 Fausto Capobianco

Dec. 27 John LaRosa

Dec. 27 Charles Ross

Dec. 28 Emily Boscia Cacciatore

Dec. 29 Thomas Dalrymple

Dec. 29 Catherine AvianatosPettros

Dec. 30 Doris Heavener Buchman

Dec. 31 John Curley

Oct. 1 Charles Bartolet Oct. 8 Georgia Jallos Sos

Oct. 11 Jacqueline Dickey Blackman

Oct. 13 Louise Balliet Liptak

Oct. 14 Shirley Foss Schweder

Oct. 14 Donald Johnson

Oct. 15 Elaine Clemens

Oct. 17 Raymond Black

Oct. 17 Elizabeth Saylor Perelli

Oct. 20 Patricia Moyer Lutz

Oct. 22 Thomas Bibleheimer

Oct. 24 Robert Eschenbach

Oct. 24 Kathleen Seawood Collina

Oct. 25 Joanne Monitti D’Agostino

Oct. 26 Peter Bretsky, Jr.

Oct. 27 Georgetta Hannah Gittens

Oct. 29 Carole Holland

Oct. 30 Alice Cuvo Loebsack

Nov. 1 Stephanie Richards Cohen Nov. 4 Marilyn Jones Haines

Nov. 7 William Hartman

Nov. 7 Marvin Rosenblum

Nov. 8 Judith Kahler Campbell

Nov. 10 James Kiick

Nov. 10 James LaBarba Nov. 11 David Mazzie

Nov. 12 Janet Transue Herr

Nov. 15 Lovene Heller

Nov. 15 Margaret Bennett

Nov. 23 Frank Mazza

Nov. 29 Sandra Crusan Kovacs

Nov. 29 Sandra Moser Zemgulis

Nov. 29 Patrica Yasunsky.McNally

Dec. 1 Rose Capecci Koder

Dec. 2 Leon Weaver

Dec. 2 Alfred DiFelice

Dec. 4 Jean Sigafoos Williams

Dec. 9 Joyce Streeter Armendaris

Dec. 13 Willard Barlieb

Dec. 12 Doris Orlowek Teich

Dec. 15 Russell Christian

Dec. 18 Avis Frable Heller

Dec. 19 Charles Claus

Dec. 19 Marjorie McGraw McDonald

Dec. 21 Carol Squarcia Shimoskie

Dec. 23 Carol Dech Stout

Dec. 25 Darla Haffling Tuller

Dec. 25 Frances Miechur Hamlin

Dec. 26 Fausto Capobianco

Dec. 27 John LaRosa

Dec. 27 Charles Ross

Dec. 28 Emily Boscia Cacciatore

Dec. 29 Thomas Dalrymple

Dec. 29 Catherine AvianatosPettros

Dec. 30 Doris Heavener Buchman

Dec. 31 John Curley

Send a classmate an Anniversary Card

October 6, 1962 John Herkalo & Beverly

October 12, 1963 John Curley & Ann

October 15, 1955 Lovene Heller & Jane

October 29, 1966 William Shoudt & Elaine

November 8, 1958 Maryann Goffredo & Frederick Breuer

November 18, 1962 Harry Lerner & Sherry

November 22, 1962 Leon Paulus & Beverly

December 5, 1987 Catherine Schulte & Carl Niedzwiecki

December 10, 1960 Robert Fisher & Linda

December 26, 1996 Gail Hutchison & James Trimble

Milestone Anniversaries 55 Years

John & Beverly Herkalo

Harry & Sherry Lerner

Leon & Beverly Paulus

30 years

Catherine Schulte & Carl Niedzwiecki

Why do senior citizens have to go to the back of the store for the pharmacy, and young people can buy cigarettes at the front?

Why do people order double cheeseburgers, large fries, and a diet coke?

Why don't you ever see the headline "Psychic Wins Lottery'?

Why is it that doctors and attorneys call what they do 'practice'?

Why didn't Noah swat those two mosquitoes?

You know that indestructible black box that is used on airplanes. Why don't they make the whole plane out of that stuff??

Celebrating Bill Horm’s Birthday 6/28/17 Sandy, Bill & Tom Biblehimer

New Addresses

Maryannm Goffredo Breuer, 17 Northgate Blvd., Easton PA 18045

Catherine E. Phillips Garrity, PO Box 202, Stockertown, PA 18083

James Piperato, 7035 35th St. E, Ellenton, FL 34222

Thank You Class of 1956 Supporters

This quarter the Class of EHS 1956 received $225 in donations.

John Ackerman, Delores DeHart Arcuri, Margaret Bennett, Tom Bibleheimer, Beverly Taylor Blasco, Dick Borini, Judy Seifert Everett, David Cook, Ronald Gladish, Joe Guadagnino, Dick Hahn, Fay Johnson, Bob Jones, Jim Kiick, Laura Hess Phillips, Larry Phillips, Sue Shuttleworth Pickel, Alice Fielding Yenolevich, Sandy Moser Zemgulis

Winners of 6/18/17 Picnic 50-50

Liz Saylor Perelli/Ed Vermillion, Bethlehem, PA 4 times

Kay Schulte Niedzwiecki, Walnutport, PA

John Ackerman, Forks Township, PA

Ronald Gladish, Womelsdorf, PA

Frank Mazza, Easton, PA

Circa 1952 can anyone identify the cheerleaders? Submitted by Janet Transue Herr

More of  Marie Hick’s Memories

On this, Friday, december 31. 1999, the last day of the year, century, mellennium I feel I should write something special to commemorate this special day but nothing of great inportance comes to mind.

And now on January 6, 2000 I am still not inspired to write but I will certainly give it a try. So many thoughts have come to mind recently, how my grandfather , Otto Rothenhausler, must have been one of the first Good Humor men. He had a horse drawn cart which he drove around town in summer and from which he dispensed icecream. We would take our bowl to meet him and he would dip iecream into it. He did have small cones, I think a cone filled with icecream was 2 cents. I don’t recall the price but scoops were priced per each, what a treat. I suppose Grandpap had some way of keeping the icecream firm but I know not what it was, certainly not anythjing more soiphisticated than blocks of ice. Now there was a treat, ice chips garnered from the ice man.

I recall Jimmy Ross was our iceman for a very long time. Jimmy’s brother, Bud, and Cheech D’Angelo worked for Jimmy and became our friends.

Ice was delivered to the house in blocks which the men hooked with large tongs. The ice was slung over their shoulder and delivered directly to the customer’s ice box. Each customer had an ice card which he put in his front window with the desired size of ice on the top side of the card.

Like the iceman many vendors came to the door. The baker came almost every day, the huckster, selling fresh produce usually came several times a week as did the butcher. There were all sorts of specialty vendors. Charles pretzels comes to mind. Then there was the egg man. He was usually the farmer who had the chickins which produced the eggs. He often would have chickens for sale along with homemade items his wife had made, cakes, pies and the like.

My Aunt Bess, my mother’s sister, became quite well known for her homemade doughnuts, cakes and pies. Her husband, Raymond Odenweller, went door to door selling the goodies. He carried them in a towel lined market basket. Market baskets were a big thing in my youth. Since we shopped almost daily and had to carry our purchases by hand and grocery bags were not readily available the basket was ever present. Our family was big on farmers’ markets, held on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday morning around Center Square from early morning until noon. The farmers rented space by the year and kept the same space year after yeart. They parked their trucks around the circle, had tables and display cases where they presented their wares on the paved sidewalk much as farmers do today. I had often gone to market with my mother so when I married it was as a natural peogression for me to shop that way too.

When you went to market you usually wore clean "housedress" and carried your market basket. On any given day a housedress was a familiar sight on the downtown streets until noon at which time the dress code changed as if by magic. No one with any pride would be cought in a housedress after the noon whistle had blown. Now it becomes hat, gloves and shopping attire time. This custom was observed by most everyone. It was entirely voluntary, I wonder how and where it started. I also wonder how the name "Hoover Apron" came to describe a wraparound dress much like a house dress except that it really did wrap around and tied in the back. I’m certain it was named for president Hoover but I know not why.

Most or maybe all industral towns had noon whistles along with several other daily whistles to signal events at the factories. Dinner time was at noon, supper time at 5: P./M., mealtimes changed for many people during WWII when shift work often dictated how we lived our lives. So many customs, habits and morals were altered by the war. Some changes were needed and were very good but many changes erased a lot that was good and wholesome in our wonder ful country. PROGRASS!!! HA

I can recall when the hobos were a part of life in small town USA. They were the drifters, homeless tramps of the day. I don’t recall that we were ever afraid of them but I also don’t recall hearing any horror stories about them. My mother couldn’t tolarate the tought of someone being hungry so all hoboes who came to our door were fed. They were invited to sit on our large back porch where they were "wined and dined." When I picture them I am reminbded of the scene from "Gone With The Wind" where the weary veterans were being fed on the grounds of Tara or was it Twelve Oaks?

Buring the dead was a totally different scene when I was a child. The mortician came to the house to prepare the body and "lay out" the deceased. The entire affair was done from the home and Marjorie reminded me that the deceased was laid out in the Parlor now called the living room. The front door of the home was adorned with a (usually) black crepe which hung there until after the funeral and the gathering which followed. Friends and neighbors usually brought food, very often a funeral pie was donated, that was a rasin pie, sometimes with a white icing on top. I have never tasted same.

I an now reminded of the QUARANTINE signs which were tacked on the door of a resident which housed some one with a contagious disease: smallpox, diptheria, measles, mumps among others. This coustom died after the discovery of antibotics, a miraculous find which made yet another major change in our lives.

Jim Kiick & Gino DiLorenzo

Margaret Bennett & Sandy Moser Zemgulis

Pat Fisher & Pat Allen

Judy Kahler Campbell, Len Buscemi, Bill & Jane Bond, Ledon Paulus

Don Herr, Ed Vermillion & Liz Saylor Perelli, Frank Mazza

Kay Schulte Niedzwiecki & Sadie Mazzarese Fraccica

Ginne & Woody Frankenfield & Bill Shoudt

Sue Shuttleworth Pickel  & Lois Rodler DiLorenzo

Pictures by Carl Niedzwiecki